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Friday, July 17, 2009

Psych Major Syndrome

Psych Major Syndrome by Alicia Thompson (August 11th 2009—Hyperion)

Grade: 3.5 stars out of 5

Summary: “Patient Name: Leigh Nolan

Age: 18 years

Presenting Concerns:
Leigh Nolan has just started her first year at Stiles College. She has decided to major in psychology (even though her parents would rather she study Tarot cards than Rorschach blots), despite reporting that she thinks, "Psychology is a load of crap."

Patient has always been very good at helping her friends with their problems, but when it comes to solving her own...not so much.

Patient has a tendency to overanalyze things, particularly when the opposite sex is involved. Like why doesn't Andrew, her boyfriend of over a year, ever invite her to spend the night? Or why can't she commit to taking the next step in their relationship? And why does his roommate Nathan dislike her so much? More importantly, why did Nathan have a starring role in a much-more-than-friendly dream?

Aggravating factors include hyper-competitive fellow psych majors, a professor who's badly in need of her own psychoanalysis, and mentoring a middle-school-aged girl who thinks Patient is, in a word, nave.

Preliminary treatment will include Introduction to Psychology, but may require more if she's going to answer these questions and make it through her freshman year.

Diagnosis:
Psych Major Syndrome”

Review: If you must know, I like cheese. Lay it thick with a cute little swirl at top. This book reminds me of that, it was cheesy, particularly at the end, with a bit of a twist—a small bit—but mostly cheese.

Tuesday aka Leigh (she prefers to be addressed by her middle name) is a psychology major that needs more help than she can provide. She’s in a half-ass relationship that leaves more to be desired (if you get my drift) but something just isn’t right (and we’re not talking about your left hand). So Leigh tries to find her center and assess her relationship with high school sweetheart in what else? A road trip! Er…okay a family visit back home.

Everyone goes through this phase where you don’t know what you want. You think you know what you want but it turns out you’re wrong. Expect the unexpected. You might like your current boyfriend, but maybe you have a slight okay, large, crush on his best friend. That is not to say I suggest cutting all ties to your beau of now to go salivate to his bestest buddy. What I mean is that Leigh is a relatable person. She has her issues, her props, and her travesties.

Leigh joins a mentoring program to help kids that are on the verge of trouble. The topic strays from psychology and moves to that of teenage pregnancy—decisions, decisions, decisions. Rebekah is just 15 when she had a miscarriage. In the program they talk about the effects of having a child when you’re so young. Responsibilities you have to uphold, sacrifices you have to make. It was interesting how the author managed to incorporate such a heavy topic within the book.

The ending was fairly norm to the T. You could have seen it coming a mile away.

Overall: Cute, oddly strange based off the summary, but true.

Cover C+
I don’t know if I like the cover or not. The model looks dumb on some accounts—dazed? dumbfounded? stargazing? stupid? I just understand the concept behind the cover. The color scheme is quite pretty I admit—I have a penchant for the colors yellow and green together.

5 comments:

  1. This book looks really good. :)

    -Briana

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  2. Expect the unexpected? Wow that's great. I'm so looking forward to reading this book. And I actually love the cover, the set seems very nice just that I don't like the model real much.

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  3. That was the way the model was supposed to look.

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  4. I think the model is actually quite beautiful. If you're gonna criticize something why not the fake grass or crumpled flowers strewn haphazardly across the ground?

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  5. I have to agree. I don't like it when publishers put a face on the book because it usually makes the heroine or hero look extremely cheesy or silly. But I guess good looks sell more books.

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